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It may not be a bad idea to put a foundation under a kit greenhouse

by:KingKonree     2020-10-25
Q: I don\'t think you are a gardener, but I need your help.
I am going to buy a small greenhouse kit and would like to know if there are special base requirements.
The manufacturer has nothing to say about it.
What is the best way to keep my investment, because this small structure costs thousands of dollars? —Linda S. Folsom, California.
A: Linda, you must have hacked into my floodlight camera and saw my poor attempt to plant tomatoes on the edge of the driveway.
My gardener is my wife.
We have hundreds of orchids in almost every room.
She has mastered the art of making many different varieties blossom, blossom and bloom again
Bloom with her tender love.
When my wife showed me, I knew a lot of small greenhouse kits.
There are quite a few designs from simple aluminum-
Tube frame covered with plastic, similar to the small and exquisite structure of a real greenhouse made of aluminum frame.
While it\'s better to follow the manufacturer\'s advice on how to install the product, adding a lot of common sense will never go wrong.
There are a lot of parts to be put together in the greenhouse that will react to ground motion
A very stable piece of molded fiberglass or plastic unit.
For these small greenhouse kits or any small prefabricated shed you may buy from a home center or dealer, Frost inflation is the biggest threat.
If you live in an area where Frost does not penetrate into the soil, you don\'t have to worry about it.
The frost in the soil may be uneven, which is the beginning of the trouble.
One side of your new greenhouse kit may be up 2 inch or more and the other side is barely up.
The structure begins to twist and the parts may break.
The biggest problem with uneven elevators is getting sick
Install doors and windows or vents that may not open or close properly.
Your local building and zoning regulations may regulate what you have to do, but usually these regulations exempt certain buildings below square feet.
Be sure to check to make sure you follow local regulations.
At the very least, you may want to build a simple foundation for the kit with treated wood that allows for contact with the soil.
I will remove the surface soil from about 12 or 18 inch and fill the ditch with gravel of about grape size.
Level the gravel and place a 4x6 frame of treated wood on it for the kit to rest.
Create a simple overlap joint at four corners and use the pass-through bolt to interlock the four parts that make up a square or rectangle.
You also need to pay great attention to the wind.
Strong winds can blow one of these kits.
Pay very close attention to the instructions on how to tie the greenhouse or shed tightly so that in the next violent storm the greenhouse will not roll in your yard.
Q: Some alterations have been made to my old apartment building and I think it will collapse!
A lot of work has been done, including the installation of new pipe drains.
The old one is black metal and the new one is white plastic.
Every morning and evening I hear these loud crackles and cracks that never happened on the walls.
This happens only when my neighbors above take a shower or take a shower.
Will the bathtub and shower hit me? —Beth C.
Staten Island, New YorkY.
A: This situation reminds me of what happened to the second house I renovated 44 years ago.
I removed the cast iron drain for a second.
Floor bathroom, replaced them with new statusof-the-art PVC pipes.
I thought I was helping myself. Being a wet-behind-the-
Ears remodeler, I do not know that the PVC pipe reacts violently to hot water.
Once someone starts running hot water in the sink or shower/tub, I hear the sound of bursting and cracking when PVC expands and rubs frame wood.
After a few minutes, the burst stops when the PVC pipe reaches the same temperature as the water.
However, when the water stops flowing, annoying breaks and bursts occur again when the PVC pipe cools to room temperature.
I also began to notice that every time someone rushed to the toilet there was a waterfall on my wall. Ugh!
No noise has ever been made from cast iron drains.
That\'s why I\'m installing cast iron drains in my daughter\'s new home.
I hope she has a quiet house and so does she.
Subscribe to Tim\'s free newsletter and listen to his new podcast.
Go to: AsktheBuilder. com.
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