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new evidence suggests two separate groups settled north americanew evidence suggests two separate groups settled north americanew evidence suggests two separate groups settled north america

by:KingKonree     2020-02-25
LOS ANGELES —
The delicate stone arrows and tools unearthed on the Channel Islands off the coast of California, as well as various marine and bird skeletons, provide strong evidence, two years ago, it turned out that North America was made up of about 13,000 migrants, one from Asia and the other from sea explorers sailing along the coast.
Archaeologists generally believe that a group of hunters cross the land bridge from northern Asia and then connect Asia and North America through the region known as Beringia, slaughtering large mammals with spears and arrows, these animals are equipped with characteristic stone tips known as Clovis points.
But there is growing evidence that a group of people from Japan sailed along the coast of two continents, traveling south to the Island of Fire, and moving inland to glacier lake in the Pacific Northwest.
The problem with proving this was that sea level was about 200 feet lower at that time.
As sea levels rise, they drown out most of the coastal sites where ancient seafarers might live, leaving them out of sight of modern researchers.
To solve this problem, archaeologist Jon M.
Erlandson of the University of Oregon and his colleagues studied caves on the Channel Islands, located above the rising waters.
This week, they reported in the journal Science that they found middens --
Garbage disposal area-
Contains a lot of bones and tools.
The arrows are made of a locally acquired rock called chert, and there are mainly two types: Thorny arrows with stems and wide new moons.
The barbed arrows are very fragile and subtle and can only be used to kill fish and similar prey, Erlandson said.
The wider fading will minimize the accuracy required to shoot birds;
In this case, he said, they are like arrows equivalent to shotguns.
Japan also found a similar view to 16,000 years ago.
In the Pacific Northwest of the Great Basin and the Columbia Plateau area and the Paisley Cave in eastern Oregon, the same point as the point found on the Channel Islands was also found.
In contrast, the Clovis points used by people living farther inland are heavier, rougher, and have a groove or dent to support the shaft.
Erlandson said no groove points were found on the islands.
The group also found the remains of shellfish, seals, geese, morants and various fish species.
Archaeologists advocate the migration to the new world through a wooden bridge. They believe that the people who made the Clovis point --
The reason for this is because they were originally discovered at a location near N Clovis. M. —
Eventually, they migrated to the shore, where they changed the technology to make arrows and spears more suitable for fishing.
However, Erlandson believes that marine culture moves to inland rivers in some areas, leaving evidence of presence near glacial lakes and other sites. McClatchy-
Los Angeles court
The delicate stone arrows and tools unearthed on the Channel Islands off the coast of California, as well as various marine and bird skeletons, provide strong evidence, two years ago, it turned out that North America was made up of about 13,000 migrants, one from Asia and the other from sea explorers sailing along the coast.
Archaeologists generally believe that a group of hunters cross the land bridge from northern Asia and then connect Asia and North America through the region known as Beringia, slaughtering large mammals with spears and arrows, these animals are equipped with characteristic stone tips known as Clovis points.
But there is growing evidence that a group of people from Japan sailed along the coast of two continents, traveling south to the Island of Fire, and moving inland to glacier lake in the Pacific Northwest.
The problem with proving this was that sea level was about 200 feet lower at that time.
As sea levels rise, they drown out most of the coastal sites where ancient seafarers might live, leaving them out of sight of modern researchers.
To solve this problem, archaeologist Jon M.
Erlandson of the University of Oregon and his colleagues studied caves on the Channel Islands, located above the rising waters.
This week, they reported in the journal Science that they found middens --
Garbage disposal area-
Contains a lot of bones and tools.
The arrows are made of a locally acquired rock called chert, and there are mainly two types: Thorny arrows with stems and wide new moons.
The barbed arrows are very fragile and subtle and can only be used to kill fish and similar prey, Erlandson said.
The wider fading will minimize the accuracy required to shoot birds;
In this case, he said, they are like arrows equivalent to shotguns.
Japan also found a similar view to 16,000 years ago.
In the Pacific Northwest of the Great Basin and the Columbia Plateau area and the Paisley Cave in eastern Oregon, the same point as the point found on the Channel Islands was also found.
In contrast, the Clovis points used by people living farther inland are heavier, rougher, and have a groove or dent to support the shaft.
Erlandson said no groove points were found on the islands.
The group also found the remains of shellfish, seals, geese, morants and various fish species.
Archaeologists advocate the migration to the new world through a wooden bridge. They believe that the people who made the Clovis point --
The reason for this is because they were originally discovered at a location near N Clovis. M. —
Eventually, they migrated to the shore, where they changed the technology to make arrows and spears more suitable for fishing.
However, Erlandson believes that marine culture moves to inland rivers in some areas, leaving evidence of presence near glacial lakes and other sites. McClatchy-
Los Angeles court
The delicate stone arrows and tools unearthed on the Channel Islands off the coast of California, as well as various marine and bird skeletons, provide strong evidence, two years ago, it turned out that North America was made up of about 13,000 migrants, one from Asia and the other from sea explorers sailing along the coast.
Archaeologists generally believe that a group of hunters cross the land bridge from northern Asia and then connect Asia and North America through the region known as Beringia, slaughtering large mammals with spears and arrows, these animals are equipped with characteristic stone tips known as Clovis points.
But there is growing evidence that a group of people from Japan sailed along the coast of two continents, traveling south to the Island of Fire, and moving inland to glacier lake in the Pacific Northwest.
The problem with proving this was that sea level was about 200 feet lower at that time.
As sea levels rise, they drown out most of the coastal sites where ancient seafarers might live, leaving them out of sight of modern researchers.
To solve this problem, archaeologist Jon M.
Erlandson of the University of Oregon and his colleagues studied caves on the Channel Islands, located above the rising waters.
This week, they reported in the journal Science that they found middens --
Garbage disposal area-
Contains a lot of bones and tools.
The arrows are made of a locally acquired rock called chert, and there are mainly two types: Thorny arrows with stems and wide new moons.
The barbed arrows are very fragile and subtle and can only be used to kill fish and similar prey, Erlandson said.
The wider fading will minimize the accuracy required to shoot birds;
In this case, he said, they are like arrows equivalent to shotguns.
Japan also found a similar view to 16,000 years ago.
In the Pacific Northwest of the Great Basin and the Columbia Plateau area and the Paisley Cave in eastern Oregon, the same point as the point found on the Channel Islands was also found.
In contrast, the Clovis points used by people living farther inland are heavier, rougher, and have a groove or dent to support the shaft.
Erlandson said no groove points were found on the islands.
The group also found the remains of shellfish, seals, geese, morants and various fish species.
Archaeologists advocate the migration to the new world through a wooden bridge. They believe that the people who made the Clovis point --
The reason for this is because they were originally discovered at a location near N Clovis. M. —
Eventually, they migrated to the shore, where they changed the technology to make arrows and spears more suitable for fishing.
However, Erlandson believes that marine culture moves to inland rivers in some areas, leaving evidence of presence near glacial lakes and other sites. McClatchy-
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